forced

Does Forced Addiction Treatment Ever Work?

What do you do when there’s nothing you can do but you can’t do nothing? Improper English, yes, but really think about it. That’s kind of what it feels like when deep in the throws of addiction and/or alcoholism. It’s a confusing life that takes you constantly on paths where you’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t. If you’re reading this article, chances are you or a loved one is questioning taking some sort of abstinence from alcohol and narcotics usage. For many of us alcoholics and addicts, we have had to take extra measures to ensure our sobriety remains solid as concrete. These additional precautions can be as simple as going to Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, getting a sponsor, working the 12 steps, and willing or forced addiction treatment.

The reality of the situation is that people with alcoholic thinking want to do what they want to do. We tend to have a difficult time separating our wants from our needs. It’s easy for people with our addictive mindsets to slip into a manner of unhealthy thinking or start justifying our actions in silly ways. A favorite of mine is when we think our addiction is minuscule and not really provoking any harm upon us, little do we know that it’s in the other room doing push up’s and becoming stronger and stronger. We need help in any way we can get it for this battle. Unfortunately, while in the confusing haze of addiction, addicts and alcoholics tend to think irrationally and struggle to recognize when help is needed. The lone wolf mentality beams brightly for most addicts and alcoholics. If we can’t think clearly and see that we need help, how are we to get out of this hole that eventually leads to being 6 feet deep? This is where forced addiction treatment comes in for some and literally saves the day.

Fake It Until You Make It?

Nobody wants to be forced into anything against their best judgment but forced addiction treatment will literally be one “punishment” that saves that person’s life. Getting admitted into a treatment center can be intimidating to anyone, especially when you are the new kid on the block and you’re not necessarily thrilled to be there. You are not alone, though. It is imperative to remember that most people in your new living arrangement are going through much of the same issues as you. Chances are that there are others among the census that are in forced addiction treatment as well and aren’t even sure they want to be clean or sober. At the end of the day, nobody likes being told what to do. We are our own human beings with our own cognitive thought processes and opinions. At the same time, though, it was our best thinking that got us into the chemical ridden misery we were living before making such changes. So maybe taking some suggestions like trying this whole “sobriety thing” out isn’t the worst that can happen to us.

drug addicted woman

Putting ourselves into a routine is something we are usually not accustomed to, yet it makes for a healthy mind, body, and soul. The thought of this can be intimidating for some, especially when their self-esteem may be lacking like mine always was. The addict or alcoholic may not even think they are worth the trouble for forced addiction treatment. This is also a clear sign of the fact that they are seeing life from a negative viewpoint and addiction is holding the reigns. Self-worth and value goes out the door for many when using narcotics heavily. All logical thought and common sense becomes clouded and it becomes impossible for that person to see clearly. Impossible for them to see the danger they’re putting their lives into. Impossible for them to see the family members and friends they’re damaging. Impossible to see that there is a way out of the misery they have self-declared to run their lives. Having a clarified look from the outside-in always differs from the hazy inside-out.

Forced addiction treatment and having the help of others is sometimes the only solution to the chaos that some of us chose to call life. As mentioned beforehand, no it’s not thrilling, but it does work for many. Many of us addicts and alcoholics enter forced addiction treatment with no dedication to getting/staying sober. Having been coerced and persuaded by a loved one or even court ordered, we find ourselves with this internal struggle of questioning life and how much effort we really want to put into it. For quite some time, we were locked into this negative mindset and teetering on the edge of death. Now were being provided this opportunity to do some things over while in forced addiction treatment and get another shot in life. Some of us who are familiar with the whole AA and 12 step thing debate whether it’s worth the trouble while others are just confused as to where they are and what alcoholism actually is.

Either way, forced addiction treatment provides an opportunity for sustenance. It goes hand in hand with the old cliché of “you can lead a horse to water but you can’t force it to drink.” This statement couldn’t ever apply more than in this scenario. Forced addiction treatment literally will place the cup of water in front of the alcoholic/addict. At the very least, they may not be listening, but the individual may hear something that rubs them the right way. Maybe, just maybe, out of 20 people working there- 1 of them will say something that resonates with the person. With addiction and alcoholism already presenting the odds against us, what could it hurt? At the very least, it’s a prospect to grow and learn some things about self that most never have the chance to.

The Choices We Make

Sometimes taking a step back and recognizing where we stand in life can be tough. Whether it’s forced or by choice, sometimes making it into a program of sorts can be life or death for some of us. If you or a loved one has been struggling with chemical dependency please don’t hesitate to call 1-800-481-8457 or visit oarcstaging.wpengine.com. One of our specialists will be patiently waiting by to assist you in making some good home decisions and putting your life in a direction you can be pleased with.

One thought on “Dealing with an Addict in Denial 

  1. rachel frampton

    My dad is an alcohol addict, and this is already affecting his everyday life, which is why I’ve decided to start looking for a medical service that may offer an addiction recovery treatment at the comfort of our home. I agree with you that most of the addicts that are in denial of their situation are usually saying that they’re just venting. Well, you’re right that it would be best to communicate with him in any way that I can.

    Reply

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